Skin Cancer in Colorado

Stats

Risk Factors and Symptoms

Skin Cancer Screening Guidelines

USPSTF

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of counseling adults about skin self-examination to prevent skin cancer.

See the USPSTF full recommendations below:

Young adults, adolescents, children, and parents of young children - B

The USPSTF recommends counseling young adults, adolescents, children, and parents of young children about minimizing exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation for persons aged 6 months to 24 years with fair skin types to reduce their risk of skin cancer.

Adults older than 24 years with fair skin types - C

The USPSTF recommends that clinicians selectively offer counseling to adults older than 24 years with fair skin types about minimizing their exposure to UV radiation to reduce risk of skin cancer. Existing evidence indicates that the net benefit of counseling all adults older than 24 years is small. In determining whether counseling is appropriate in individual cases, patients and clinicians should consider the presence of risk factors for skin cancer.

See the Clinical Considerations section for information on risk assessment.

Adults - I

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of counseling adults about skin self-examination to prevent skin cancer.

See the Clinical Considerations section for suggestions for practice regarding the I statement.

More info on the ratings listed above: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2675551

American Cancer Society

“Although the ACS does not have guidelines for the early detection of skin cancer, knowing your own skin is important to finding skin cancer early.  Many doctors also recommend regular skin exams.

Regular skin exams are especially important for people who are at higher risk of skin cancer, such as people with reduced immunity, people who have had skin cancer before, and people with a strong family history of skin cancer. Talk to your doctor about how often you should have your skin examined.”

Source: https://www.cancer.org/cancer/skin-cancer/prevention-and-early-detection/skin-exams.html

American Academy of Dermatology

Perform regular skin self-exams to detect skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable, and see a board-certified dermatologist if you notice new or suspicious spots on your skin, or anything changing, itching or bleeding.
If you have a history of melanoma:
•full-body exam by a board-certified dermatologist at least annually
•AND perform regular self-exams to check for new and changing moles

Source: https://www.aad.org/public/spot-skin-cancer/learn-about-skin-cancer/detect

Skin Cancer and the Cancer Plan

Sun Protection and the Cancer Plan

Support Groups

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