Ovarian Cancer in Colorado

The Ovarian Cancer Data – Who it affects? 

Incidence – A cancer incidence rate is the number of new cancers of a specific site/type occurring in a specified population during a year, usually expressed as the number of cancers per 100,000 population at risk. That is,

Incidence rate = (New cancers / Population) × 100,000
The numerator of the incidence rate is the number of new cancers; the denominator is the size of the population.


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Mortality – A cancer mortality rate is the number of deaths, with cancer as the underlying cause of death, occurring in a specified population during a year. Cancer mortality is usually expressed as the number of deaths due to cancer per 100,000 population. That is,

Mortality Rate = (Cancer Deaths / Population) × 100,000

The numerator of the mortality rate is the number of deaths; the denominator is the size of the population.


 

Family History Tool: My Family Health Portrait – https://familyhistory.hhs.gov

Find a Genetic Counselor: http://cocancergenetics.org/resources/counseling-services/

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Ovarian Cancer – The Symptoms

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Ovarian Cancer the Colorado Cancer Plan 

3.1 Strategies

  1. Support efforts seeking to standardize family history data collection in electronic health records to allow providers to identify individuals whose family history meets the clinical criteria for a hereditary cancer syndrome and those who should be referred to a genetic counselor.
  2. Educate providers on guidelines for family history collection and referral for genetic counseling and testing, including potential BRCA1/2 mutations or Lynch Syndrome.
  3. Conduct demonstration projects that implement family history screening tools in primary or specialty care settings to identify patients at risk for hereditary cancer.
  4. Develop referral and communication systems to facilitate on-site or referred cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, including tele-counseling, and testing services by a qualified genetics professional.
  5. Promote access to genetic counseling based on risk assessment prior to genetic testing to review potential risks and benefits, including post-test risk and benefits when prophylactic options are under consideration.
  6. Identify funding sources for genetic counseling and testing for at-risk individuals who are unable to pay.
  7. Promote appropriate insurance coverage, especially Medicaid coverage, of genetic counseling, testing and ensuing clinical services for high-risk individuals.

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5.3 Strategies

  1. Increase awareness of the symptoms of nonscreenable cancers among health care providers and individuals.
  2. Educate medical and health care students via structured programs about symptoms, risk factors, early detection, genetic counseling and genetic testing for non-screenable cancer types.
  3. Support research studies, including randomized control trials, to investigate new and innovative cancer screening tests.